Thermal Resort/Rogner Bad Blumau


The Rogner Bad Blumau in Austria is half work of contemporary art, half luxury spa hotel. Austrian architect Friedensreich Hundertwasser came up with the unusual looking village, which looks like a scene from a cartoon with no straight lines and bold blocks of colour. The surrounding landscape and large amounts of green grass give it an even more fairytale feel, and the design intends to reconnect visitors with nature.


Built over a hot spring with the highest mineral content of any in Europe, it certainly offers visitors the opportunity to take advantage of nature’s healing properties, whether by bathing in one of its eight thermal pools or indulging in one of the many therapeutic treatments derived from locally sourced products such as pumpkin, grape, apple and elderberry.


But it is its holistic approach to sustainability that really makes it stand out. “The aim of the spa when it was conceived by Robert Rogner in 1993 was to integrate it harmoniously with nature and within the local communities,” says general manager Hannes Czeitschner. MORE


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Solar Shrimp,

More Than A Tasty Treat


Scientists from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have created electricity-generating solar cells using chemicals derived from the shells of shrimp and other crustaceans, a development that could have a major impact on the cost of producing solar power.


The research is focused on nanotechnology, specifically the highly conductive light-absorbing quantum dots used in thin-film and spray-on solar technology.


These tiny crystals can be tuned to specific wavelengths of light, multiplying the energy production of electrons throughout solar devices. They can also trap and convert infrared light to energy, light that would otherwise heat up and degrade photovoltaic processes.


The team discovered that two materials found in the shells of shrimp and crustaceans, chitin and chitosan, MORE


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Eiffel Tower

A Power Source of Clean Energy


UGE International Ltd. has installed two on-site wind turbines on the Eiffel Tower as part of a major renovation to the first floor of the iconic structure.


The two UGE VisionAIR5 wind turbines will produce 10,000 kilowatt hours annually, enough to power the commercial areas of the Eiffel Tower’s first floor.


The vertical-axis VisionAIR5 turbine has a height of 5.2m and a width of 3.2m. It has a cut in wind speed of 3.5 m/s and a survival wind speed of 50 m/s. UGE says the VisionAIR5 has been designed for a service life of at least 20 years and isquieter than a human whisper’. MORE



World's Largest Wind Farm is Approved in The UK


Planning consent for the gigantic Dogger Bank Creyke Beck wind farm, set to become the world’s biggest offshore wind power project, has been granted by the UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC).


The project will have a total generating capacity of 2.4GW, enough to meet the needs of around two million British households. Once built, it is expected to be one of the UK’s largest sources of electricity, supplying 8 terawatt-hours of green energy per year – or 2.5 per cent of the nation’s energy requirements.  MORE




The DUTCH Wind Wheel Skyscraper



The Dutch WindWheel, touted as a “sustainable icon,” is as controversial as it is stunning.


The Dutch Windwheel Corporation has set its sights on building the unique facility in Rotterdam, The Netherlands, to “be a showcase and accelerator for innovation, renewable energy and the circular and inclusive economy.”  MORE



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Description:  

"Flying the Friendly, CLEAR Skies with BOEING"




We all feel guilty about the environmental damage of our travel.  Our hope is always that we add more value to life than we take away from the health of the environment.

This segment will make you feel good about aviation's commitment to green, so clearly seen in the work being done by Julie Felgar, Managing Director Environmental Strategy at Boeing.  First, we hear how the aviation has already made terrific progress in reducing their emissions.  Compound that with their goals of further cutting their carbon output by 50% by 2020, and eliminating all waste to the landfill, and you have an industry, and an industry leader, in Boeing, that inspires confidence in mankind's ability to sustain a beautiful world that is full of economic rewards.

The next time you board a plane, think about this interview and the great work being done to make that plane earth-friendly and incredibly safe. MORE

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